The Edward T. LeBlanc Memorial Dime Novel Bibliography

Item - Ye Are Bidden To A Feast

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(source: NIU Libraries)
Online Full Text: Northern Illinois University
Series: New York Weekly v. 32 no. 4 — page 3
Subject / Tag: Poem
Part of: New York Weekly v. XXXII, no. 4, December 11, 1876 (Issue)
Author: Kidder, M. A. (Mary Ann), 1820-1905
Date: December 11, 1876
Edition Description: "A certain man made a great supper, and bade many." He spoke at length on the excuses which those made who were bidden-the man who had bought a piece of ground, the man who had some oxen, and the man who had married a wife, Referring to the last, Mr. Moody said, amid loud laughter: "Why didn't he take his wife with him?" These men were all telling lies to ease their consciences, "Eighteen hundred years have now passed away, but have men got wise?" asked Mr. Moody. He had come to the South of London to invite them to a supper-the marriage supper of the Lamb-and would they, too, make excuses? He then touched upon some of the popular excuses of the present day: "Who is the easiest to serve-the devil or Christ?" asked Mr. Moody. "Christ!" echoed from the pit, gallery, and stage. "Now, then, is not the way of the transgressor hard?" he added, inquiringly. "Yes," was the prompt reply. Pointing to a little girl seated near the stage, Mr. Moody asked her if she would like to be invited to a birthday party. The little one thus addressed having timidly answered in the affirmative, Mr. Moody said all had been invited to a great feast, and would they not accept the invitation? He did not believe an unconverted man had anything to do with the doctrine of election, for the Scripture said: "Whosoever will, let him come." His closing appeal was most affecting, and people were to be seen weeping in all parts of the building. Mr. Moody concluded his address by asking all those who wished to be prayed for and to become Christians to stand up. About a score do so. "Thank God!" exclaimed Mr. Moody, with emotion. "Any more? Any more? Any more?" Each time this question was asked more rose, until at least 300 stood, while Mr. Moody pleaded for them at the throne of grace. The service was in every way a great success, and must have been very gratifying to all present who were assisting in the movement.-Mr. Moody in London.
First Sentence: To a feast ye all are bidden

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