The Edward T. LeBlanc Memorial Dime Novel Bibliography

Item - Massasoit's daughter, or, The French captives

(Beadle's Dime Novels edition)
(Beadle's Pocket Novels edition)

Combined Summary

Online Full Text: Northern Illinois University (Beadle's Dime Novels edition)
Northern Illinois University (Beadle's Pocket Novels edition)
Series: Beadle's Dime Novels — no. 19
Beadle's Pocket Novels — no. 233
Alternate Title: Massasoit's daughter, or, The French captives : a romance of aboriginal New-England
Subjects / Tags: Colonists
Comets
Earthquakes
English
French
Frontier and pioneer life
Historical fiction
History
Hurricanes
Indian captivities
Indians of North America
Massachusetts
Massasoit, 1580-1661
Sea stories
Shipwrecks
Slave trade
Smallpox
United States
Author: Duganne, A. J. H. (Augustine Joseph Hickey), 1823-1884
Dates: March 15, 1861 (Beadle's Dime Novels edition)
May 29, 1883 (Beadle's Pocket Novels edition)
Publishers: Beadle's Dime Novels edition: Beadle and Company (New York: 141 William St.) -- United States of America
Beadle's Pocket Novels edition: Beadle and Adams (1872-1898) (New York: No. 98 William Street) -- United States of America
OCLC Numbers: 08921447 (Beadle's Dime Novels edition)
30479464 (Beadle's Pocket Novels edition)
ENGL 693 Spring 2018's Thoughts: "An early dime novel, Massasoit’s Daughter, published in 1861, tells the tale of two Indian daughters and their interaction with captive white settlers who were marooned by a shipwreck in 1615. Sameena, the titular character, is the prototypical Indian princess. She intervenes on behalf of two French captives, an old preacher and Louis, when they are taken prisoner, eventually falling in love with the latter. The other daughter is Monoma, offspring of the noble Tisqountam, who befriends a young French girl, Marie. The main antagonist is the former captain of the ship, a Creole Buccaneer named Captain Pierre. Pierre avows to ravage Indian lands and capture slaves after losing his ship, and in so doing, murders the wife of a Pequod chieftain Mattakan, instigating the main conflict of the story. While Mattakan does eventually claim his vengeance against Pierre, the war leads to the slaughter of all on the ship, save for the preacher, Louis, and Marie. Tisqountam is nearly killed by Pierre while trying to call for peace in the Indian council. Sameena eventually leads a daring pair of Englishmen, Robin Ball and St. Elmo, to the Frenchman, who they liberate. At the moment of liberation, a comet flies across the sky and a hurricane blows in, cowing the natives into submission due to their religious beliefs. It ends happily, with Tisqountam surviving and leading his tribe westward, and Sameena marrying and settling with Louis in Canada. The epilogue mentions that disease “occurs” in the tribes, greatly decreasing their number. The story is noteworthy for its repeated opposition to slavery, demonstrating that even abolitionist-leaning texts relied heavily on racist tropes regarding Native Americans, as the text portrays the vengeful natives as bloody warriors with the scalps of women and children mounted on their spears. There are also notable examples of the noble savage and Indian princess trope."--Doug DePalma, graduate student at NIU enrolled in ENGL 693, Spring 2018

More reviews by ENGL 693 Spring 2018

Known Editions

Beadle's Dime Novels edition
Beadle's Pocket Novels edition

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